Life and Health


There are many types of life insurance to fit individual needs and circumstance. The following are some of the basic types of life insurance available.

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Term Insurance

Term Insurance – The simplest form of insurance. You purchase coverage for a specific price for a specified period. If you die during that time, your beneficiary receives the value of the policy. There is no investment component.

Whole Life

Whole Life – Similar to term, but you purchase the policy to cover your “whole life” not just a set period. Premiums remain level throughout the life of the policy, and the company invests at least a portion of your premiums. Some firms share investment proceeds with policyholders in the form of a dividend. Many companies will offer “a relatively low guaranteed rate of return,” but in reality pay at a rate in excess of the guarantee.

Universal Life

Universal Life – You decide how much you want to put in over and above a minimum premium. The company chooses the investment vehicle, which is generally restricted to bonds and mortgages. The investment and the returns go into a cash-value account, which you can use against premiums or allow to build.

Variable Life

Variable Life – With a variable policy, there is usually a wider selection of investment products, including stock funds. As with a universal policy, returns on investments can offset the cost of premiums or build in the account. And depending on the type of policy, the beneficiaries will either receive the face value of the policy or the face value plus all or part of the cash account.


Healthcare Plans

An individual or family health insurance plan covers one person, or a family, on one plan.
Most insurance companies offer the same types of managed healthcare plans to individuals that are offered to groups: HMO’s (Healthcare Maintenance Organizations), PPO’s (Preferred Provider Organizations) and POS’s (Point of Service Plan), and generally offer different levels of deductible to keep premiums within budget. Each person or family must determine what coverage, premium, deductible and out of pocket expense will best suit their needs and their family budget.

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We are here to assist you in finding a plan that protects your family while staying within your budget. Please contact us today to help evaluate your health insurance options.


Dental insurance is equally important to health insurance because dental disease is still prevalent. Being protected by a dental plan and using it wisely are necessary safeguards for your entire family.

Dental Plans

Dental benefits plans can be categorized by the options offered for selecting a dentist. Some plans allow you the freedom to choose your own dentist, while others, in exchange for lower rates, limit your choice.

Dollar Cap

To control dental treatment costs, most plans will limit the amount of care you can receive in a given year. This is done by placing a dollar “cap” or limit on the amount of benefits you can receive, or by restricting the number or type of services that are covered.

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As each individual and family have different circumstances please contact us today to evaluate your dental insurance needs and we will work to find the plan the best fits your needs and budget.


When a physical injury keeps you from working, disability insurance can help get the bills paid. Disability insurance is as important as (and, in some cases, even more important than) life insurance. There are many kinds of disability policies and options, however, the basics are simple.

What is Disability

The second variable is the definition of disability — whether it is “own occ,” or the inability to perform the duties of your specific occupation, or “any occ,” the inability to perform the duties of any job for which your education and training make you qualified.

Monthly Benefit

The first variable is the amount of monthly benefit. Most disability policies have a fixed monthly benefit that does not increase with time, although you can purchase extra coverage, or riders, that offer higher payment schedules.

Waiting Period

The third variable is the waiting period, or the amount of time you must be disabled before benefits kick in. These waiting periods can range from one week to two years, and the longer you wait the less your disability policy will cost.

Benefit Period

The fourth variable is the benefit period, or how long you will receive monthly benefits once your policy starts paying. The benefit period can range from six months to life, depending on what you choose as well as what your insurance company is willing to offer you.

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